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Print at Oct 31, 2020 6:42:20 PM

Posted by basso at May 3, 2009 6:13:06 PM
Re: Riddle me this.
 


If familiars were awarded more regularly for duty/crafting puzzle competitions, would this event have felt like such a slap in the face? (I'm aware there are other factors. I'm just trying to get a feel for how big this aspect is.)


Think of the Olympics in real life. Gold medals only go to those who win events. Silver and bronze medals go to those who place 2nd and 3rd. If one day they decide to give any medal to the 35th qualifier, how does that not cheapen what a medal is supposed to be about?

Anyways, yes more competitions would be great, but no, it would not lessen the slap to serious players. It has nothing to do with me or anyone winning or not winning a familiar. This is not personal. I am not trying to prevent certain people from winning things. It is simply about "medals" going to those who earn them by performing the best. Like others have said, if you want to have a raffle, just make it a straight raffle.

This game was and is still billed as being based on "puzzling" skills. Can you really type that getting a fine in rigging demonstrates skill in that puzzle? How can you reconcile that a person on each ocean "won" something highly desirable for a performance that was decidedly below average? What can you possibly say to all the long term dedicated and skilled puzzlers who have never sniffed even a tan familiar? Personally, I have won 5 familiars, so this has nothing to do with me not winning. I have hearties who can pull constant incredibles on every station, but are never quite good enough to get the highest one. The slap was on their faces most of all.

I know you are a horse racing fan, and that horse that won the race performed in a decidedly above average way. You could even call its performance "incredible". Purposely setting up a competition to contrive a win for an underdog is not the same thing at all. The "underdog pirate" certainly didn't beat anyone at all. They performed the task at a low level, and fell on the correct side of an arbitrary cutoff point, that is invisible to everyone.

I often go out of my way to help and encourage newer players. I have spent hours helping them to improve their puzzling, set up stalls, or go over basics of how pillaging works. Most of them end up just asking me for poe. Many of them also tell me how "lucky" I am to own familiars and shops. They seem to think that because I have so much, they are entitled to some of it. The point is that everyone wants something for nothing these days. I started with nothing, and clawed my way up the food chain. If I look at what I have now, I feel satisfaction because I have earned every single pixel of it (minus 20 dubs bought, once to make my account permanent, once to get a stupid trophy). Now, giving away a tan familiar (worth roughly 1.5m-2m on dub oceans) for practically nothing only feeds this attitude of entitlement. I am sure many players asked, "why not me?" when it ended. Rather than encourage people to reach for the top, you had us all trip over ourselves to scrape the bottom. As humorous as that is from a certain point of view, it has tremendously negative affects on the culture of the game. Furthermore, sinking blockades were going on at this time. Suddenly having everyone flock to and scoring fines on sails is terrible for the overall performance of the ship. The entire thing simply did not seem very well thought out. I do appreciate the fact that you are a creative and fun Ocean Master. I also understand that you had positive intentions with this competition. Believe me when I say this though, that a little bit of the game died for me that night. Dramatic? Yes, it is, but I am sharing my thoughts. If nothing else, I know I am not alone on this one.
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Montage of Sage
Mads wrote: 
OK, now I'm convinced. The problem here is that you cannot understand plain English.


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